Download Bodies and Voices: The Force- Field of Representation and by Mereta Falck Borch, Eva Rask Knudsen, Martin Leer PDF

By Mereta Falck Borch, Eva Rask Knudsen, Martin Leer

A wide-ranging number of essays targeted on readings of the physique in modern literary and socio-anthropological discourse, from slavery and rape to woman genital mutilation, from garments, ocular pornography, voice, deformation and transmutation to the imprisoned, dismembered, remembered, kidnapped or ghostly physique, in Africa, Australasia and the Pacific, Canada, the Caribbean, nice Britain and ireland

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Additional info for Bodies and Voices: The Force- Field of Representation and Discourse in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies

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It flows up through his body and out upon me; it passes through the cabin, through the wreck; washing the cliffs and shores of the island, it runs northward and southward to the ends of the earth. (157) No doubt this wordless message escapes our system of codification, which is to be expected in “a place where bodies are their own signs. It is the home of Friday” (157). 21 Two main voices can be heard, first that of a narrator who is persistently trying to extract David’s story from him. Most of the time, however, David’s answers seem beside the point as he tries to evade questioning, especially about a third, shadowy character, Dulcie.

For instance, at one moment, the anguish of David reminiscing about Dulcie is so intense that it passes on to the narrator as an hallucination, and she stares at her “screen full-bleed with Dulcie. Who? Is it you put it in my head? The terrible things happening to Dulcie? It’s here, in close-up – and he stumbles to his feet with a horrible cry, knocking me over as he charges out” (201). In other words, does David’s anguish reveal his own participation in Dulcie’s torture? And what is to be made of the fleeting, unexpected vision of Dulcie washing blood from her hands?

It’s here, in close-up – and he stumbles to his feet with a horrible cry, knocking me over as he charges out” (201). In other words, does David’s anguish reveal his own participation in Dulcie’s torture? And what is to be made of the fleeting, unexpected vision of Dulcie washing blood from her hands? Did she also participate in torturing? There seems to be no end to the cycle of violence and suspicion, so that the very allusiveness of the book suggests the difficulty there still is in reconstructing the garbled, painful history of South Africa.

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