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44 1975: The development of the silicon chip made smaller computers possible. Bill Gates and Paul Allen start Microsoft. 1976: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak start Apple Computers. 1977: Apple begins selling its first popular computer, the Apple II. 1981: IBM releases the popular 5150, using Microsoft’s operating system. 1984: Apple introduces its popular Macintosh computer. 1991: The World Wide Web begins and computer sales increase. 45 Glossary bit (bit): a single binary digit, a 1 or 0 byte (bite): a group of binary digits that a computer transforms into a number, letter, or something else CD-ROM (SEE-DEE ROM): a computer drive that plays compact discs and has read-only memory central processing unit (SEN-truhl PROSS-ess-ing YOO-nit): the processor or part of the computer that processes software or information; sometimes called CPU crashed (KRASHT): stopped working properly cursor (KUR-sur): an indicator on your computer screen that shows your position when you’re typing or pointing and clicking digital (DIJ-uh-tuhl): using digits, or numbers discs (DISKS): pieces of software containing information that can be inserted into a computer drive electricity (i-lek-TRISS-uh-tee): a form of energy generated by the movement of electrons and protons email (EE-mayl): short for electronic mail, sent over the Internet by one computer user to another gigabyte (GIG-uh-bite): about a billion bytes hard drives (HARD DRIVES): parts inside computers that store large amounts of information Internet (IN-tur-net): an electronic web of billions of sites that you can connect to with a computer and modem keyboard (KEE-bord): the board where you can type letters and numbers onto the computer screen kilobyte (KIL-uh-bite): about a thousand bytes 46 mainframe (MAYN FRAYM): a large central computer that has memory and programs for smaller computers megabyte (MEG-uh-bite): about a million bytes memory (MEM-uh-ree): lets computers store and save files, information, and programs modem (MOH-duhm): a computer output that connects the computer to the Internet monitor (MON-uh-tur): the screen of a computer mouse (MOUSS): a computer input that allows you to point and click to open programs or highlight things on the screen PC (PEE-SEE): a personal computer that uses Microsoft software rather than a computer made by Apple processor (PROSS-ess-ur): the part of the computer that handles all the information, sometimes called the central processing unit or CPU RAM (RAM): stands for random access memory, the part of the computer’s memory that is lost when the computer is turned off reboot (re-BOOT): restart the computer ROM (ROM): stands for read-only memory, the information that can be read but not changed silicon chip (SIL-uh-kuhn CHIP): a computer chip that let computers get small enough for personal use switches (SWICH-es): the devices that control the flow of binary signals transistors (tran-ZISS-turz): devices that control the flow of electricity websites (WEB-sites): a central location for related web pages on the Internet 47 Index Allen, Paul 22 Atanasoff, John V.

1981: IBM releases the popular 5150, using Microsoft’s operating system. 1984: Apple introduces its popular Macintosh computer. 1991: The World Wide Web begins and computer sales increase. 45 Glossary bit (bit): a single binary digit, a 1 or 0 byte (bite): a group of binary digits that a computer transforms into a number, letter, or something else CD-ROM (SEE-DEE ROM): a computer drive that plays compact discs and has read-only memory central processing unit (SEN-truhl PROSS-ess-ing YOO-nit): the processor or part of the computer that processes software or information; sometimes called CPU crashed (KRASHT): stopped working properly cursor (KUR-sur): an indicator on your computer screen that shows your position when you’re typing or pointing and clicking digital (DIJ-uh-tuhl): using digits, or numbers discs (DISKS): pieces of software containing information that can be inserted into a computer drive electricity (i-lek-TRISS-uh-tee): a form of energy generated by the movement of electrons and protons email (EE-mayl): short for electronic mail, sent over the Internet by one computer user to another gigabyte (GIG-uh-bite): about a billion bytes hard drives (HARD DRIVES): parts inside computers that store large amounts of information Internet (IN-tur-net): an electronic web of billions of sites that you can connect to with a computer and modem keyboard (KEE-bord): the board where you can type letters and numbers onto the computer screen kilobyte (KIL-uh-bite): about a thousand bytes 46 mainframe (MAYN FRAYM): a large central computer that has memory and programs for smaller computers megabyte (MEG-uh-bite): about a million bytes memory (MEM-uh-ree): lets computers store and save files, information, and programs modem (MOH-duhm): a computer output that connects the computer to the Internet monitor (MON-uh-tur): the screen of a computer mouse (MOUSS): a computer input that allows you to point and click to open programs or highlight things on the screen PC (PEE-SEE): a personal computer that uses Microsoft software rather than a computer made by Apple processor (PROSS-ess-ur): the part of the computer that handles all the information, sometimes called the central processing unit or CPU RAM (RAM): stands for random access memory, the part of the computer’s memory that is lost when the computer is turned off reboot (re-BOOT): restart the computer ROM (ROM): stands for read-only memory, the information that can be read but not changed silicon chip (SIL-uh-kuhn CHIP): a computer chip that let computers get small enough for personal use switches (SWICH-es): the devices that control the flow of binary signals transistors (tran-ZISS-turz): devices that control the flow of electricity websites (WEB-sites): a central location for related web pages on the Internet 47 Index Allen, Paul 22 Atanasoff, John V.

1960s: Companies and the government start making more and more use of big computers. 44 1975: The development of the silicon chip made smaller computers possible. Bill Gates and Paul Allen start Microsoft. 1976: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak start Apple Computers. 1977: Apple begins selling its first popular computer, the Apple II. 1981: IBM releases the popular 5150, using Microsoft’s operating system. 1984: Apple introduces its popular Macintosh computer. 1991: The World Wide Web begins and computer sales increase.

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